KNOWLEDGE
RENEWAL & TRANSFER

 

The ways that knowledge is learned and taught is often as important as the knowledge itself.  We forefront projects encouraging Inuit traditional knowledge and Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit. We do not see traditional knowledge as being static or belonging to the past, but something that is constantly in a process of adapting to the challenges and conditions of the modern world. These approaches stress that knowledge is meant to be used, and should be collected in contexts that re-enforce traditional and healthy relationships between generations, family, community, and the land. When knowledge is developed outside this framework, it loses much of its meaning and relevance.

Our community-based projects incorporate the knowledge and expertise of Inuinnait knowledge holders, with the goal of transferring this knowledge to younger generations.  

For over 20 years, we have designed and delivered oral history and traditional knowledge projects, land camps, and technology revitalization projects involving Elders and youth. This leadership and programming has become more crucial as the last generation of Elders who grew up on the land continues to decline. 

We're ensuring that Inuinnait knowledge is transferred to the next generation through:

WORKSHOPS & CULTURAL PROGRAMS

Over the years, regular workshops and cultural programs have involved the transfer of knowledge from Inuinnait Elders to the next generation.

ELDERS-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM

 

Multiple part-time Elders work on-site each year, contributing to ongoing language and culture revitalization. The Elders-in-Residence are available to anyone, be it school groups, researchers, local organizations, or community members. Each day, the Elders’ group provides cultural counseling, teaches traditional skills, fosters a language nest, and answers questions about everything from sewing techniques to raising children.

EXHIBITS & COLLECTIONS

We curate exhibitions for display at the May Hakongak Centre, and work to showcase our culture through temporary exhibitions at museums across Canada. Our team of Elders and knowledge holders actively works with global cultural institutions to interpret and build upon their Inuinnait holdings. 

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

 

We prioritize the creation of accessible resources publications that teach Inuit and non-Inuit about the histories, languages and knowledge traditions of the North.  This work targets academic researchers, bringing a uniquely Inuit voice to peer-review publications, books, classrooms and conferences. 

MAY HAKONGAK CENTRE

Our facility supports a public library, cultural program space, museum and exhibits, art gallery and regional archives. It is repository for information and knowledge gathered through various projects, and a venue to share Inuit knowledge, language, and culture with our community. 

ORAL HERITAGE INTERVIEWS

 

We document Inuinnait experiences, heritage and knowledge through first person recorded interviews. These interviews work to create a permanent record of documented traditional knowledge to help current and future generations connect to and maintain Inuinnait culture. Using video allows us to document correct language pronunciations, a critically important component of knowledge sharing as we revitalize Inuinnaqtun.

ELIK TOLOGANAK ON THE IMPORTANCE OF INTERGENERATIONAL KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER. 

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