Featured Cultural Programs

The Kitikmeot Heritage Society is committed to the documentation and preservation of Inuit knowledge through collaborative research methodologies. We host a range of heritage research programs including archaeology, oral history, traditional knowledge and Inuinnaqtun/Inuktitut place name projects.  We also look towards the future of Inuit culture, developing a range of digital resources that allow Inuit culture to persevere through new technologies.

The goal of our research is not only to gather academic knowledge, but also to develop skills, educational resources and research capacity among local people.  We highlight research topics that stem from local interests and concerns, as these produce information that is both usable and relevant to our communities.  Our archive and library of reference materials continues to grow, and offers opportunities for staff, students, local people, and visiting researchers to access primary sources of information on Inuit culture and history. Learn more about our research through the featured projects below:

Iqaluktuuq

Iqaluktuuq

The Iqaluktuuq Project is a long term study of the cultural history of the Iqaluktuuq area near Cambridge Bay, Nunavut. This area is rich with archaeological deposits that tell the story of almost 5000 years of cultures occupying the region.  read more

Traditional Skin Preparation and Sewing

Traditional Skin Preparation and Sewing

The Kitikmeot Heritage Society has created a number of community and educational programs centred around Inuinnait traditions of skin preparation and sewing with the goals of increasing knowledge of traditional skills, building Inuinnaqtun language, and forging stronger intergenerational relationships. read more

Igluminimnut ailirama: Returning home

Igluminimnut ailirama: Returning home

In the Inuinnaqtun language, the word ‘iglu’ directly translates as ‘home.’ The Igluminimnut ailirama project was designed in 2012 to help Cambridge Bay residents familiarize themselves with igluit as both physical buildings and a former way of life for Inuinnait people.   read more

Fish and Feather: Traditions of loon and char skin sewing

Fish and Feather: Traditions of loon and char skin sewing

The fish and feather program was an initiative to learn more about both local and pan-Arctic traditions of using fish and birds as sewing materials.  Research for the project took place over the course of a two week land camp in 2011.
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Paddling Home: The return of a traditional kayak

Paddling Home: The return of a traditional kayak

The Paddling Home Program was designed to facilitate the return of a historic Copper Inuit kayak to its home community of Kugluktuk.

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The Kuukyuak Program

The Kuukyuak Program

The Kuukyuak Program was designed to bring elders, residential school survivors and Inuinnait youth back to their ancestral home of Kuukyuak (Perry River) to document the abandoned community and re-learn the land’s skills, knowledge and stories. read more